Project

Ecology, Evolution, and Engineering for Empowered Brains

Jack Flanagan

EEEeb Spring 2018: April 15,  29; May 13, 27; June 3. 

To register, please visit this link.

Sponsored and run by members of the MIT Media Lab and the Empowered Brain InstituteEcology, Evolution, and Engineering for Empowered Brains is an eight-week, sensory-friendly series of related educational workshops for neurodivergent individuals (ages 8 - 14) which aims to hone skills in understanding, interpreting, and protecting the natural environment. Through creative, hands-on teaching exercises and field visits, participants become comfortable with basic ecological principles, as well as emerging technologies used to sculpt ecological and evolutionary processes. We discuss contemporary issues related to conservation and highlight engineering strategies with which to address these obstacles. Through project-based learning, students will have the opportunity to develop understanding by experimentation—or play—and workshops will emphasize immersion, rather than memorization. Wholly, we seek to foster a safe and creative learning space in which students are able to develop the necessary technical literacy … View full description

EEEeb Spring 2018: April 15,  29; May 13, 27; June 3. 

To register, please visit this link.

Sponsored and run by members of the MIT Media Lab and the Empowered Brain InstituteEcology, Evolution, and Engineering for Empowered Brains is an eight-week, sensory-friendly series of related educational workshops for neurodivergent individuals (ages 8 - 14) which aims to hone skills in understanding, interpreting, and protecting the natural environment. Through creative, hands-on teaching exercises and field visits, participants become comfortable with basic ecological principles, as well as emerging technologies used to sculpt ecological and evolutionary processes. We discuss contemporary issues related to conservation and highlight engineering strategies with which to address these obstacles. Through project-based learning, students will have the opportunity to develop understanding by experimentation—or play—and workshops will emphasize immersion, rather than memorization. Wholly, we seek to foster a safe and creative learning space in which students are able to develop the necessary technical literacy to become future leaders in the myriad realms of environmental science. 

For questions, please contact Avery Normandin (ave@media.mit.edu).