Farita Tasnim

Conformable Decoders
  • Research Assistant

Farita Tasnim earned her B.S. in Electrical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and is now a Ph.D. student in the Conformable Decoders research group at the MIT Media Lab.  Her current research melds physics, medicine, and engineering to better understand the nonequilibrium character of life at mesoscopic and macroscopic scales.

For her Master's work, her interests lay in designing and implementing the protocol, processes, geometries, and fabrication steps for optimizing the design of piezoelectric sensors and energy harvesters to intimately couple to different parts of the human body, whether it is the surface of the face or the knee, the inside of the brain, or even woven into personal garments. This work focuses on the intersection between energy harvesting, sensing, and biological integration, so as to create seamless, hybrid, self-powered conformable sensors for continuous monitoring of longitudinal health patterns.

For her PhD work, she studies the physics of living systems, from two angles: (i) better informing medical diagnosis and treatment using fundamental physical quantities of a sy… View full description

Farita Tasnim earned her B.S. in Electrical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and is now a Ph.D. student in the Conformable Decoders research group at the MIT Media Lab.  Her current research melds physics, medicine, and engineering to better understand the nonequilibrium character of life at mesoscopic and macroscopic scales.

For her Master's work, her interests lay in designing and implementing the protocol, processes, geometries, and fabrication steps for optimizing the design of piezoelectric sensors and energy harvesters to intimately couple to different parts of the human body, whether it is the surface of the face or the knee, the inside of the brain, or even woven into personal garments. This work focuses on the intersection between energy harvesting, sensing, and biological integration, so as to create seamless, hybrid, self-powered conformable sensors for continuous monitoring of longitudinal health patterns.

For her PhD work, she studies the physics of living systems, from two angles: (i) better informing medical diagnosis and treatment using fundamental physical quantities of a system in nonequilibrium dynamics, such as irreversibility, broken detailed balance, and informational/entropic flows; and (ii) trying to develop a theoretical framework by which the properties of life (self-replication, information processing and storage, adaptation on multiple time scales) could emerge.